The Secret Adversary A work of detective fiction by Agatha Christie, first published in the United Kingdom 1922, and in the United States later in that same year. The story is worth knowing, it introduces two characters, Tommy and Tuppence, who will be featured in three other Christie books and one collection of short stories written throughout her writing career. Set in 1919 London and various other outlying locales throughout Britain, young couple Tommy Beresford and Prudence "Tuppence" Cowley, out of work and money, form the "The Young Adventurers, Ltd." planning to hiring themselves out as "adventurers … willing to do anything, go anywhere … no unreasonable offer refused."

The New York Times Book Review of June 11, 1922, "It is safe to assert that unless the reader peers into the last chapter or so of the tale, he will not know who this secret adversary is until the author chooses to reveal him." And that Christie "gives a sense of plausibility to the most preposterous situations and developments." Also, it conceded that "Miss Christie has a clever prattling style that shifts easily into amusing dialogue and so aids the pleasure of the reader as he tears along with Tommy and Tuppence on the trail of the mysterious Mr. Brown. Many of the situations are a bit moth-eaten from frequent usage by other writers, but at that Miss Christie manages to invest them with a new sense of individuality that renders them rather absorbing."

Factoid: The Secret Adversary was the second Christie work to be turned into a film. Made in Germany by the Orplid Film company and released in that country on February 15, 1929, it was entitled Die Abenteurer GmbH, was a silent movie and ran for 76 minutes. It was released in the UK and US as Adventures Inc. Character names from the book were changed for the film. Previously thought to be lost, it was given a rare showing at the National Film Theatre on July 15, 2001

 

 
Agatha Christie The Mysterious Affair at Styles CSF Publishing classic Poirot Hercule
eBook ISBN 978-1-937487-36-2

 

The Mysterious Affair at Styles is a detective novel by Agatha Christie. It was written in 1916 and was first published by John Lane in the United States in October 1920 and in the United Kingdom by The Bodley Head (John Lane's UK company) on January 21, 1921. The U.S. edition retailed at $2.00 and the UK edition at seven shillings and sixpence. It is Christie's first published novel, and introduces Hercule Poirot, Inspector (later, Chief Inspector) Japp and Lieutenant Hastings (later, Captain). The story is told in first person by Hastings, and features many of the elements that, thanks to Christie, have become icons of the Golden Age of Detective Fiction. It is set in a large, isolated country manor. There are a half-dozen suspects, most of whom are hiding facts about themselves. The book includes maps of the house, the murder scene, and a drawing of a fragment of a will. Also, there are a number of red herrings and surprise plot twists.

 

Dame Agatha Christie, DBE, (September 15, 1890 – January 12, 1976), was a British crime writer of novels, short stories, and plays. She also wrote romances under the name Mary Westmacott, but she is best remembered for her 66 detective novels and 14 short story collections (especially those featuring Hercule Poirot or Miss Jane Marple), and her successful West End Theatre plays.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Christie is the best-selling writer of books of all time and, with William Shakespeare, the best-selling author of any type. She has sold roughly four billion copies of her novels. According to Index Translationum, Christie is the most translated individual author, with only the collective corporate works of Walt Disney Productions surpassing her. Her books have been translated into at least 103 languages.